Week, or two days, Commencing 29th May 2020.

Oh well my holiday is over and back to writing a Sunday Report, but it was good to get back out on the river after almost two months of idleness. Weather conditions were far from ideal, but I don’t think too many people cared too much it was just good to be casting a line. On Saturday night I saw my first family of mallard ducklings of the season, two months behind normal.

There is going to be a change in the weather over the next few days and things will return to something like normal, there might even be some rain, but probably not enough to do much good. The tides are building all week but the river really needs a decent rise to drop the temperature and encourage the fish out of a much cooler sea.

 

Catches, well as you can imagine Friday was reasonable even with temperatures in the mid -twenties and the sun baking down. My Brae correspondent is presently furloughed but speaking to some anglers there appeared to be a few fish about.

 

Rothes had eleven on Friday, including some big fish. Graham Ritchie had a 20 lb from Gean Tree. Evie Glass and Allan McKay had mid teen fish from Carnegie. Ryan Clark had four for his day. Saturday was a little quieter with three landed.

Robbie with Evie Glass’s fish Carnegie Rothes.

Allan McKay Carnegie Rothes.

Isla Rothes.

Isla Rothes.

Isla Rothes.

 

Aberlour, Bruce Cameron continued where he left off with a fish on Friday, losing a bigger one as well.

Kinermony, Peter Kyte’s week was somewhat truncated both in days and anglers but Peter managed four fish.

Peter Kyte Kinermony.

Peter Kyte Kinermony

Peter Kyte Kinermony

 

Wester Elchies went one better, with five landed and another couple lost.

Cuilean Wester Elchies.

 

Carron also had five, thanks to Neil Borthwick for the pictures, as he says, “there’s never a gillie about when you need one”

Neil Borthwick’s fish Carron.

Neil Borthwick’s fish Carron.

Neil Borthwick’s fish Carron.

 

Overall the standard of photos is not to the usual high quality but with many gillies either fishing themselves or not being there, or simply social distancing, anglers had to manage themselves.

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