Managing the River

Managing the River
Access

Access

In 2003 the Land Reform (Scotland) Act gave recreational access rights to the general public to most land and water within Scotland.
Managing the River
Predators

Predators

Managing conflicts with other piscivorous species, each of may have its own conservation designation is an important role of the Spey Fishery Board and Foundation. The key predators of salmonids are piscivorous birds e.g. goosanders…
Managing the River
Riverworks

Riverworks

The Spey Catchment Steering Group consisting of representatives of the Spey Fishery Board, Scottish Natural Heritage, the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and Highland and Moray Councils launched a “River Works Code” for the Spey in…
Managing the River
Hatchery

Hatchery

An increasing number of behavioural and genetic studies have shown that the Atlantic salmon is structured into multiple, distinct breeding populations. The evidence shows that salmon in different river systems belong to different breeding populations…
Managing the River
Habitat

Habitat

With a catchment size of over 3000km2 the Spey is the third largest river in Scotland. The length of all the river and burns total more than 36,500km providing a huge area of habitat for…
Managing the River
Bailiffs

Bailiffs

Angling on the Spey contributes over £12 million each year to the local economy and provides 367 full-time-equivalent jobs.Poaching therefore not only causes irreparable environmental damage, but also has a significant impact upon the local…