Avon smolt trap

A couple days ago we decided that building the Rotary Screw Trap (RST) in the Avon during the lower water conditions would be a good idea although the river did rise about 7″ overnight with some rain and snow melt yesterday. However we weren’t stuck and a small area of shallower and slacker water was found in which to build the trap.

The team building the 6' RST in the lower Avon

The team building the 6′ RST in the lower Avon

The building site was at the bottom of a steep bank but the construction of the trap went very well. The most awkward part was fitting the 6′ diameter cone.

The upstream facing cone being fitted to the trap.

Fitting the upstream facing cone to the trap.

As can be seen in the photos above there are wooden stakes all along the right bank of the river in this area. At some time in the past the river was straightened and the bank reinforced with wooden stakes and rock armour. Some of these old stakes were utilised to create a mooring point for the trap.

6' lengths of pipe were fitted to three of the old wooded stakes to provide a "berth" for the smolt trap

6′ lengths of pipe were fitted to three of the old wooded stakes to provide a “berth” for the smolt trap

The builiding site was a couple hundred metres upstream of the berth. The fast current was ideal for floating the trap down into location

The builiding site was a couple hundred metres upstream of the berth. The fast current was ideal for floating the trap down into location

Securing the trap into position

Securing the trap into position

Trap in postion ready for operation from next week.

Trap in postion ready for operation from next week.  One good point about this location was there were plenty trees along the bank which were suitable for anchoring points.

The site we selected looks really good for the trap with easy access from the bank. In a river as large and fast flowing as the Avon we didn’t want to moor the trap midstream as we did for example on the Truim/Tromie. If moored midstream the mooring ropes are much more likely to catch debris such as branches, or even trees in high flows. Hopefully it will be secure alongside the bank. When tested the drum revolved at a good speed so it should fish well.

A very satisfactory morning with a good team effort from the bailiffs and the Foundation staff. The only issue was a potential diplomatic incident concerning some daffidols but I’m sure Roger’s extensive experience with the United Nations will allow him to nip it in the bud!

 

There is 1 comment for this article
  1. Sean Dugan at 4:25 pm

    Great stuff Brian, and I’ll add this trap into the 2014-onwards section of the smolt data report if that’s OK with you. Also contained in that section at present is the Fiddich trap that Richie mentioned in his questionnaire response.
    Cheers

    Sean

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